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Andrena fenningeri Viereck, 1922
Andrena (Trachandrena) indianensis Cockerell, 1929; Andrena (Mimandrena) verna Mitchell, 1960

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Andrenidae   Andrena
Subgenus: Scrapteropsis

Andrena fenningeri, Mid-Atlantic Phenology
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Andrena fenningeri, Mid-Atlantic Phenology

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Andrena fenningeri, female, top
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena fenningeri, female, top
Andrena fenningeri, female, face
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena fenningeri, female, face

Andrena fenningeri, female, side
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena fenningeri, female, side
Andrena fenningeri, female, top
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena fenningeri, female, top

Andrena fenningeri, female, wing
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena fenningeri, female, wing
Andrena fenningeri, M, Back, TN, Sevier County, Amber ---.. ZS PMax
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Andrena fenningeri, M, Back, TN, Sevier County, Amber ---.. ZS PMax

Andrena fenningeri, F, Back, Bowie, Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
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Andrena fenningeri, F, Back, Bowie, Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
Andrena fenningeri, F, Face, Bowie, Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena fenningeri, F, Face, Bowie, Maryland ---.. ZS PMax

Andrena fenningeri, F, Side, Bowie, Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena fenningeri, F, Side, Bowie, Maryland ---.. ZS PMax
Andrena fenningeri, M, Side, TN, Sevier County, Amber ---.
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena fenningeri, M, Side, TN, Sevier County, Amber ---.

Andrena fenningeri, M, Face, TN, Sevier County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena fenningeri, M, Face, TN, Sevier County ---.. ZS PMax
Andrena fenningeri, M, Back, TN, Sevier County ---.. ZS PMax
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena fenningeri, M, Back, TN, Sevier County ---.. ZS PMax

Andrena fenningeri, f, face, Pr. Georges Co. MD ---.
© Copyright source/photographer · 5
Andrena fenningeri, f, face, Pr. Georges Co. MD ---.
Andrena fenningeri, figure37h
Mitchell, Bees of the Eastern United States, Vol. I, 1960 · 1
Andrena fenningeri, figure37h
Overview
Reprinted with permission of the American Entomological Society from: LaBerge, W. E. 1971b. A revision of the bees of the genus Andrena of the Western Hemisphere. Part IV. Scrapteropsis, Xiphandrena, and Rhaphandrena. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 97: 441-520.

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A. fenningeri is a relatively uncommon but widespread species closely related to A. imitatrix and A. morrisonella. The male of fenningeri was described by Mitchell (1960, p. 206) as a new species, A. verna, whereas the male Mitchell (1960, p. 182) described as that of fenningeri in reality belongs with his species A. ilicis (Mitchell, 1960, p. 186).

The female of fenningeri can be readily separated from that of imitatrix by the propodeal corbicula lacking plumose hairs anteriorly and having only simple internal hairs. A. fenningeri females are, in this respect, like those of ilicis and morrisonella from which they can be told by the peculiar form of the tergal punctation. In fenningeri females terga 2-4 (and often 1) have the basal area punctures close-set, whereas the apical area punctures are sparse and irregularly spaced, especially in the median third or more of each tergum. In the other species of Scrapteropsis thus far described. either the basal area punctures do not contrast markedly with the apical area punctures in spacing or the punctures of the apical area are more crowded than in the basal area.

The male of fenningeri can be readily separated from that of either imitatrix or ilicis by the sixth sternum being reflexed apically with the lateral corners of the reflexed margin forming right angles and are, thus, somewhat tooth-like. The male of morrisonella is as yet to be described, but it would not be surprising to find that it had a reflexed sixth sternum also.

FEMALE. MEASUREMENTS AND RATIOS. N = 20; length. 9-11 mm; width. 2.5-3.5 mm; wing length, M = 3.69 0.201 mm; FL/FW, M = 0.98 : 0.004; FOVL/FOVW, M = 3.08 0.056.

INTEGUMENTAL COLOR. Black except as follows: mandible with apical third rufescent; flagellar segments 3-10 dark brown to dark reddish-brown below; wing membranes hyaline, veins dark reddish-brown to dark brown. pterostigma always dark brown; sterna 2-5 with apical areas hyaline: distitarsi often dark rufescent.

STRUCTURE. Antennal scape somewhat longer than flagellar segments 1-4: flagellar segment 1 slightly shorter than 2 plus 3, segment 2 shorter than 3 and 3 shorter than 4, segments 2 and 3 broader than long. 4-9 quadrate. Eyes, malar space and mandible as in imitatrix. Galea as in imitatrix but surface dulled by regular tessellation. Maxillary palpus as in imitatrix but segmental ratio about 0.9: 1.0: 0.8: 0.8: 0.8: 0.8. Labial palpus as in imitatrix but ratio about 1.0: 0.7: 0.7: 0.7. Labral process entire, trapezoidal or triangular: labrum apically without transverse sulcus, with many indistinct, short, longitudinal rugulae. Clypeus as in imitatrix but punctures slightly sparser. Supraclypeal area as in imitatrix, Genal area as in imitatrix but under surface of head with rugulae indistinct or not turned strongly inwards toward hypostomal carinae. Vertex extremely short, above lateral ocellus equal to about half an ocellar diameter or slightly more. Face above antennal fossae and facial fovea as in imitatrix.

Thoracic sculpturing as in imitatrix except as follows: mesoscutal punctures of anterior third slightly sparser; mesepisternum finely punctatorugose anteriorly, finely punctate posteriorly. Hind femur without ventral carinae or ridges: hind tibia narrow, broadest at or near apex. Wing venation as in imitatrix.

Metasomal tergum 1 with basal area with punctures round, deep, separated by less than one puncture width, shiny to moderately so, lightly shagreened: apical area with narrow marginal area impunctate, otherwise punctures similar to basal area but often slightly sparser, surface often moderately dulled by fine shagreening. Tergum 2 with basal area punctures crowded as in tergum 1. apical area punctures irregularly scattered, separated mostly by one to two or more puncture widths, often restricted to basal half or slightly more of apical area, surface moderately dulled by fine reticular shagreening. Terga 3 and 4 similar to 2 but punctures progressively sparser in both basal and apical areas. Pygidial plate and sterna as in imitatrix.

VESTITURE. Generally white to cinereous with vertex and thoracic dorsum ochraceous. Form and disposition of hair as in imitatrix except propodeal corbicula without plumose hairs anteriorly and internal hairs entirely simple.

MALE. MEASUREMENTS AND RATIOS. N = 20; length, 7-9 mm; width, 2-3 mm; wing length, M = 3.34 0.202 mm; FL/FW, M = 0.96 0.005; FS1/FS2, M = 0.92 0.016.

INTEGUMENTAL COLOR. Black with same exceptions as in female.

STRUCTURE. Antennae moderately long, in repose barely reaching propodeum: scape length and flagellar segments as in imitatrix Eyes each about three and one-half times as long as broad, inner margins converging slightly towards mandibles. Malar space, mandible and galea as in female. Maxillary palpus as in female but segmental ratio about 0.9: 1.0: 0.7: 0.7: 0.6: 0.6. Labial palpus as in female but ratio about 1.0: 0.7: 0.6: 0.5. Labral process usually twice as broad as long. distinctly emarginate apically. Clypeus as in female but median impunctate line often absent. Supraclypeal area, genal area, vertex and face above antennal fossae as in female. Facial foveae absent.

Thoracic sculpturing as in female except as follows: mesoscutal punctures much sparser, posteromedially separated mostly by three to five puncture widths, anteriorly and peripherally by half to one puncture width or slightly more: mesepisternum extremely finely punctatorugose or distinctly punctate with coarse tessellation. Hind tibia broadest at apex, not inflated subapically as in imitatrix. Wing venation as in imitatrix.

Metasomal tergum I with basal area punctures separated mostly by one puncture width, apical area narrowly impunctate along margin, basally with punctures separated mostly by one to one and one-half puncture widths, surface moderately dulled by reticular shagreening. Tergum 2 with basal area punctures separated mostly by two puncture widths, apical area with basal half or slightly more with scattered punctures separated by three to five puncture widths, surface shiny to moderately dull. lightly shagreened. Terga 3-5 similar to 2 but with progressively sparser punctures. Sterna as in imitatrix except sternum 6 with margin sharply reflexed with sharp, right-angled lateral corners.

Terminalia as in figures 17-21; note the following: sternum 7 with deep emargination with lateral lobe with oblique outside-apical margin: gonocoxite with dorsal lobe moderately blunt, curved outwards; penis valve tip extremely narrow.

VESTITURE. Generally white to cinereous; form and disposition as in imitatrix but clypeus with beard less dense.



Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1960. Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 141.

FEMALE. Length 9 mm.; breadth of face nearly equal to its length; clypeus broadly convex, projecting somewhat less than one-half below suborbital line, somewhat shining, with a rather distinct, narrow, median, impunctate line, punctures on each side deep and distinct, rather sparse and fine near center, becoming almost crowded at extreme sides; facial foveae rather broad, occupying above most of space between eyes and ocelli, covered with whitish tomentum; space between margin of vertex and lateral ocelli subequal to their diameter; cheeks very slightly broader than eyes, rounded posteriorly, somewhat shining, punctures exceedingly minute and quite close; malar space very short; basal segment of flagellum subequal to 2nd and 3rd combined; process of labrum subtriangular, rather narrowly truncate apically; pubescence of head, thorax and legs whitish, somewhat ochraceous on tarsi beneath; scutum and scutellum somewhat shining, punctures deep and distinct, rather fine, close anteriorly on scutum, becoming more widely separated but hardly sparse near center posteriorly, quite close over most of scutellum, which is quite flat; pleura dull, subrugose anteriorly, becoming quite smooth posteriorly; dorsal area of propodeum oblique, triangle coarsely rugoso-striate; propodeal corbicula poorly developed, short, thin, white, without an anterior fringe; trochanteral floccus complete, rather dense; hind tibiae rather slender, apex only slightly wider than basitarsi, scopa rather dense, hairs simple, of moderate length, entirely whitish; front and mid basitarsi slightly narrower than their respective tibiae; 2nd submarginal cell considerably shorter than 3rd, receiving 1st recurrent near middle; abdominal terga somewhat shining between the close, deep and distinct, but rather fine punctures, which are uniformly distributed, apical impressed area more sparsely and finely punctate, rather shallow, occupying about one-third length of disc medially, becoming somewhat reddened toward rim, discal pubescence extremely short, thin, apparently entirely pale, fasciae not developed, tergum 5 with a brownish yellow, apical fimbria.

MALE. Length 8 mm.; face slightly longer than distance between eyes; clypeus very slightly convex, projecting about one-third below suborbital line, punctures rather fine but deep, closely crowded throughout, pubescence quite dense, obscuring the surface; space between margin of vertex and lateral ocelli subequal to their diameter; cheeks very slightly narrower than eyes, rounded posteriorly, dull, surface finely roughened; malar space very short; basal segment of flagellum very slightly longer than broad at apex, slightly shorter than 2nd and following segments; process of labrum short and quite broad, slightly narrowed to the broadly truncate apex; mandibles rather short, with a distinct, subapical, inner tooth; pubescence of head, thorax and legs whitish; scutum and scutellum dull, densely but finely tessellate, punctures shallow and rather obscure, rather close anteriorly, becoming quite sparse posteriorly, rather sparse and irregular on scutellum; pleura rather finely but uniformly rugose; dorsal area of propodeum oblique, triangle quite coarsely rugoso-striate; basitarsi slender and elongate, considerably narrower than their respective tibiae, 2nd submarginal cell considerably shorter than 3rd, receiving 1st recurrent slightly beyond middle; abdominal terga somewhat shining, punctures fine, evenly distributed, well separated but not sparse, apical impressed areas occupying about one-third median length of disc, shallow, becoming impunctate and somewhat reddened toward rims, discal pubescence extremely short and thin, erect, entirely pale, fasciae not developed; apical margin of sternum 6 not noticeably reflexed; sternum 7 broadly rounded, with a very slight, median indentation; apical projection of sternum 8 slender, slightly constricted just below the rounded apex, with rather long, dense pubescence, base abruptly broadened; penis valves slender apically, only slightly dilated toward base, excavated laterally, gonocoxites broadly and abruptly dilated apically, forming hatchet-shaped apical lobes, gonocoxal lobes much produced, triangular, acute apically, nearly reaching apical lobes of gonocoxites (similar to hippotes, fig. 37).

DISTRIBUTION. Michigan to New York, south to Georgia; March to June.

FLOWER RECORDS. Acer, Amelanchier, Aronia, Malus, Prunus, Salix and Taraxacum.


Described using the synonymous name: Andrena verna Mitchell

MALE. Length 7 mm.; face only slightly longer than distance between eyes; clypeus broadly convex, projecting about one-fourth below suborbital line, smooth and shining between fine and rather close, evenly distributed punctures, somewhat closer at extreme sides, without a median, impunctate area; space between margin of vertex and lateral ocelli subequal to their diameter; cheeks broader than eyes, rounded posteriorly, dull and very finely striate, punctures inevident; malar space extremely short; basal segment of flagellum very short, not much longer than apex is broad, very slightly shorter than 2nd segment, successive following segments being slightly longer; process of labrum rather large, somewhat narrowed to the rather broadly truncate and slightly emarginate apex, median length about half its basal width; mandibles rather short, with a distinct, inner, subapical tooth, overlapping about one-third; pubescence of head, thorax and legs rather short and sparse, entirely whitish; scutum dull and tessellate, punctures shallow, rather fine, well separated anteriorly, becoming somewhat more widely separated posteriorly, those on scutellum more distinct, fine and close, somewhat sparse on each side of middle, surface more shining; pleura roughened, densely tessellate, but hardly rugose; dorsal area of propodeum oblique, triangle quite coarsely striate, with six or seven striae evenly distributed on each side; all basitarsi slender and elongate, considerably narrower than their respective tibiae; 2nd submarginal cell slightly shorter than 3rd, receiving 1st recurrent near middle; abdominal terga somewhat shining, punctures lather deep, quite distinct, rather fine and close, apical impressed areas rather narrow and shallow, almost entirely impunctate, becoming somewhat reddened along rims, discal pubescence extremely sparse, short and obscure, apparently entirely pale, fasciae not developed; apical margin of sternum 6 quite strongly reflexed, the lateral angles almost recurved; sternum 8 rather abruptly constricted near middle to form the narrow apical portion, which is rather slender, quite abruptly truncate at apex, nearly parallel-sided, clothed beneath with very short, pale ochraceous pubescence; penis valves slender apically, very slightly broadened toward base, rather shallowly excavated laterally toward base, gonocoxites rather short, slightly dilated apically, the resulting lobes rather small, subtriangular, nearly pointed apically, gonocoxal lobes strongly produced, nearly reaching apical lobes of the gonocoxites, rather narrowly rounded at apex.

TYPES. Holotype: Male, Raleigh, N. C., March 13, 1945, (Mitchell, on Prunus) [author's coll.]. Paratypes: NORTH CAROLINA: 21 MM, topotypical, Mar. 12, 1925, Mar. 19, 1938, Mar. 11, 15 and 21, 1945 (Mitchell, on Prunus and Salix). MARYLAND: 1 M, College Park, Apr. 20, 1944 (H. F. Howden). INDIANA: 1 M, Tippecanoe Co., Apr. 9, 1933; 5 MM, Carroll Co., Apr. 12, 1931. 16 MM, Tippecanoe Co., April 3 & 14, 1954 & 1956 (Montgomery, on Salix). MISSISSIPPI: 12 MM, Vicksburg, Mar. 11, 1955 (Dreisbach).

Paratypes are in the collections of Purdue University, H. F. Howden, T. H. Hubbell, R. R. Dreisbach, and of the author.

This species is very similar in its general appearance to the male of imitatrix, but the following contrasting characters will serve to separate them: Lateral apical angles of sternum 6 strongly reflexed in verna, not reflexed in imitatrix; gonocoxites triangularly dilated apically in verna, more rounded and club-like in imitatrix; and penis valves not toothed at base in verna, distinctly so in imitatrix.

Names
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FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Euphorbiaceae  Euphorbia @ CUIC_ENT (1)
Polycitoridae  Salix sp @ BBSL (3)
Rosaceae  Aronia @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Prunus americana @ AMNH_BEE (1)

Prunus @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Salicaceae  Salix humilis @ AMNH_BEE (2)
_  apple @ NLA (8)

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