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Andrena subaustralis Cockerell, 1898
Andrena (Cryptandrena) subaustralis Cockerell, 1898; Andrena viridinitens Cockerell, 1936

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Andrenidae   Andrena
Subgenus: Tylandrena

Andrena subaustralis, female, face
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena subaustralis, female, face

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Andrena subaustralis, female, side
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena subaustralis, female, side
Andrena subaustralis, female, top
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena subaustralis, female, top

Andrena subaustralis, female, wing
Smithsonian Institution, Entomology Department · 9
Andrena subaustralis, female, wing
Andrena subaustralis FEM CFP
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Andrena subaustralis FEM CFP

Andrena subaustralis MALE CFP
© Copyright Laurence Packer 2014 · 7
Andrena subaustralis MALE CFP
Andrena subaustralis, 194460, female, hummeral ridge interrupted by suture along dorsoventral ridge
© USDA Bee Biology and Systematics Laboratory, Logan Utah · 1
Andrena subaustralis, 194460, female, hummeral ridge interrupted by suture along dorsoventral ridge
Overview
Reprinted with permission of the American Entomological Society from: LaBerge, W. E., Bouseman, J. K. 1970. A revision of the bees of the genus Andrena of the Western Hemisphere. Part III. Tylandrena. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 96: 543-605.

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This species is closely related to A. erythrogaster from which it is extremely difficult to separate. The females of subaustralis have abdomens uniformly dark in color, whereas those of erythrogaster, especially in the west, have abdomens largely red. The male of subaustralis differs from that of erythrogaster by the usually darker abdomen and the longer hairs on the first two metasomal terga. In addition, both sexes of subaustralis can often be distinguished from those of erythrogaster by the vestiture being more yellow or ochraceous and by the mesoscutum and scutellum being less coarsely shagreened and shinier.

FEMALE. MEASUREMENTS AND RATIOS. N = 20; length, 10-13 mm; width, 3.5-4.0 mm; wing length, M = 4.41 0.195 mm; FL/FW, M = 0.91 0.006; FOVL/FOVW, M = 3.57 0.048.

INTEGUMENTAL COLOR. Black except as follows: mandibles largely rufescent; flagellar segments 3- or 4-10 dark reddish-brown below; wing veins and pterostigma red to reddish-brown, membrane hyaline, yellow, slightly darker apically; distitarsi red, basitarsi often orange or red, hind tibiae occasionally orange or red at least apically; terga with apices slightly translucent and obscurely rufescent just basad of apical areas, but never bright red, usually showing extremely faint metallic reflections.

STRUCTURE. In general as in erythrogaster but with following differences: clypeus usually without impunctate median longitudinal line, occasionally small central area with sparse punctures; maxillary palpal segmental ratio about 1.0:0.8:0.7:0.6:0.5:0.4; labial palpal ratio about 1.0:0.8:0.6:0.6;mesoscutum with posteromedian area of sparse punctures shiny, reticular shagreening absent or faint; scutellum with surface shiny, rarely with faint reticular shagreening except peripherally; pygidial plate usually with internal raised triangular area but poorly developed.

VESTITURE. Generally as in erythrogaster except as follows: usually pale ochraceous to dark yellow above; terga 2-5 usually with moderately well-formed lateral patches of sparse pale pubescence in basal areas. MALE. MEASUREMENTS AND RATIOS. N = 20; length, 8.5-12.0 mm; width, 2.0-3.0 mm; wing length, M = 3.90 0.248 mm; FL/FW, M = 0.91 0.046; FS1/FS2, M = 1.43 0.021.

INTEGUMENTAL COLOR. Generally black except as follows: mandibles with at least apices rufescent; flagellar segments 3-11 dark brown below; wing veins and pterostigma red to brownish-red, membrane hyaline, slightly infumate; terga with apical areas slightly translucent and somewhat rufescent but without red markings basally.

STRUCTURE. As in erythrogaster with the following differences: clypeal punctures slightly more crowded and only rarely with a small sparsely punctate median area; maxillary palpal segmental ratio about 1.0:1.0:0.9:0.9:0.8:0.6; labial palpal ratio about 1.0:0.8:0.6:0.6; face above antennae with rugae coarser, often anastomizing between antennae and ocelli; mesoscutum and scutellum usually shinier as in female; terminalia as illustrated (Figs. 11-15).

VESTITURE. Generally as in erythrogaster but usually pale ochraceous to dark yellow above; terga 1 and 2 with hairs longer and often not as erect.

REMARKS. A. subaustralis, first described from New Mexico, has been considered as a western subspecies of erythrogaster (Linsley, 1951). Mitchell (1960), Knerer and Atwood (1964) and others have used this name for dark eastern specimens of erythrogaster. As we have discussed above, the dark specimens of erythrogaster occur chiefly in the northeastern part of its range and to some extent southeast. As one looks at specimens from further west, it is evident that a dine exists in erythrogaster with the palest populations occurring in the westernmost parts of its range. A. subaustralis, on the other hand, is uniformly dark in color and overlaps with erythrogaster in at least two localities; British Columbia and northern Utah. A series of 31 female specimens from Utah include 29 subaustralis and two erythrogaster. No intermediate forms are present. In view of the existing dine in erythrogaster and the abrupt change to the darker subaustralis without intermediate forms intervening, we conclude that subaustralis should be treated as a distinct species, although morphologically very similar to erythrogaster.



Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1960. Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 141.

Described using the synonymous name: Andrena erythrogaster subaustralis Cockerell

This is the dark form of erythrogaster, lacking as the female does the ferruginous coloration of the abdomen. The abdomen in the males of both forms is usually dark, with only an occasional specimen of typical erythrogaster, apparently, having a uniformly ferruginous color of this area. Thus the males are very difficult or impossible to distinguish, in the absence of the females.

DISTRIBUTION. In the East this ranges from Minnesota to Quebec and the New England states, south to Tennessee. Georgia and Florida; March to May. In Florida it is recorded as early as February.

FLOWER RECORDS. Aronia, Brassica, Crataegus, Prunus, Salix and Stellaria.

Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Anacardiaceae  Rhus aromatica @ BBSL (1)
Asteraceae  Baccharis sp @ BBSL (1)
Brassicaceae  Brassica sp @ BBSL (2)
Grossulariaceae  Ribes aureum @ AMNH_BEE (1)
Polycitoridae  Salix sp @ BBSL (9)
Rosaceae  Amelanchier sp @ BBSL (1)
Salicaceae  Salix exigua @ BBSL (2)

Salix @ AMNH_BEE (1)
_  Withheld @ BBSL (62)

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Updated: 2019-08-25 07:32:14 gmt
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