D I S C O V E R    L I F E   
Bee Hunt! Odonata Lepidoptera 
  HomeAll Living ThingsIDnature guidesGlobal mapperAlbumsLabelsSearch
  AboutNewsEventsResearchEducationProjectsStudy sitesHelp


Nomada augustiana Mitchell, 1962
Nomada indusata Mitchell, 1962

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Apidae   Nomada
Subgenus: None

Nomada augustiana, HT
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, HT

Click on map for details about points.

Links
80x5 - 240x3 - 240x4 - 320x1 - 320x2 - 320x3 - 640x1 - 640x2
Set display option above.
Click on images to enlarge.
Nomada augustiana, HT hind tibia
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, HT hind tibia
Nomada augustiana, HT hind tibia2
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, HT hind tibia2

Nomada augustiana, HT metasoma
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, HT metasoma
Nomada augustiana, m flagellum
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, m flagellum

Nomada augustiana, m habitus
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, m habitus
Nomada augustiana, m hind tibia
Molly Rightmyer · 1
Nomada augustiana, m hind tibia

Nomada augustiana T1 33%
© Mary Paul · 1
Nomada augustiana T1 33%
Nomada augustiana female T2 yellow
© Mary Paul · 1
Nomada augustiana female T2 yellow

Nomada augustiana female T2 yellow
© Mary Paul · 1
Nomada augustiana female T2 yellow
Nomada augustiana female T4 stripe broken
© Mary Paul · 1
Nomada augustiana female T4 stripe broken

Nomada augustiana, female, cheek,
© Mary Paul · 1
Nomada augustiana, female, cheek,
Overview
Reprinted with permission from: Mitchell, T.B. 1962 Bees of the Eastern United States. North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Technical Bulletin No. 152.

FEMALE—Length 8.5 mm.; lateral ocelli subequally distant from margin of vertex and each other; cheeks nearly as- broad as eyes, posterior margin subcarinate; longer side of basal segment of flagellum equal to segment median segments somewhat longer than broad; mandibles slender, elongate and simple wings subhyaline basally, becoming somewhat infuscated along outer margin and in marginal cell, with the usual three submarginal cells, 2nd and 3rd subequal anteriorly, veins piceous, basal vein interstitial or nearly with transverse median; tegulae very finely, closely and deeply punctate throughout; posterior margin of scutellum rather deeply grooved medially; front coxae not spined; apex of hind tibiae with 4 or 5, rather elongate and robust, spinelike setae; labrum, base of mandibles and lateral areas of face below antennae, bright yellow, the supraclypeal area, clypeus and median portion of mandibles more testaceous; face above antennae, vertex and cheeks in part more ferruginous, a small amount of black between and above antennae, between ocelli and over posterior half of cheeks, the latter yellow in part below; antennal scape yellowish anteriorly, flagellum more brownish-testaceous; pronotal collar narrowly, tubercles, upper surface of scutellum, posterior face of propodeum in large part, and a transverse, submedian band on pleura, bright yellow; thorax otherwise dark red, but scutum with a very narrow, median, blackish line, metapleura in part and lateral areas of pronotum, black; legs largely testaceous to ferruginous, femora somewhat blackened toward base, the mid and hind coxae blackish beneath; spurs pale yellow; tegulae more testaceous; abdominal terga 1-3 with rather extensive, lateral, yellow maculae which are somewhat separated medially, those on tergum 1 submedian, rather narrow, apical impressed area and base piceous, space between the maculae more or less ferruginous; terga 2 and 3 becoming somewhat piceous apically, more or less ferruginous between and basad of the maculae; terga 4 and 5 with more submedian maculations which are little if any interrupted medially, but with small, lateral maculations which are slightly separated from the median areas; punctures deep distinct, very close and rather coarse on face above antennae and on vertex, becoming much finer and densely crowded on cheeks below, supraclypeal area and clypeus, lateral areas below more coarsely and deeply punctate; scutum densely and rather finely rugoso-punctate, scutellum with deeper, more distinct punctures, mesopleura rather finely rugoso-punctate, propodeum finely and rather shallowly rugose posteriorly and laterally, triangle almost entirely yellow, rather smooth below, becoming rather coarsely and irregularly striate above; discs of abdominal terga very closely, finely, but quite distinctly punctate, punctures becoming more minute and widely separated toward the apical impunctate rims, tergum 1 becoming impunctate laterally basally, tergum 4 quite broadly impunctate apically; pseudopygidium transverse, very short, forming the truncate apical margin of tergum 5, densely covered with suberect silvery tomentum; pubescence very short, thin, entirely pale where evident, slightly more copious on head and thorax below and on propodeum posteriorly, hardly evident on abdomen dorsally; sternum 5 apically with a pair of tufts of elongate, curved, brownish hairs which converge medially.

TYPE — Holotype: Female, Augusta, Richmond Co., Ga., April 1, 1959 (R. R. Snelling, on Salix). [author’s coil.].


Identification
Extracted from Droege, S. 2010. New synonymies in the bee genus Nomada from North America (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Zootaxa, 2661: 1-32.

Diagnosis. Females can be differentiated from other North American Nomada by the following combination of characters: head and mesosoma with limited amounts of black integumental color (Fig. 1); scutellum entirely yellow on its dorsal surface (shading to orange near metanotum) (Fig. 1); hind tibia at outer apical margin with three to four long, red, stout spine-like hairs that clearly extend beyond the surrounding finer white hairs (three present on one hind leg, four on the other leg in the holotype specimen—based on trends in other Nomada, it is likely that other specimens of this species could have a slightly greater number of such stout red spine-like hairs present) (Fig. 13); and T2–T3 each with transverse, medially-interrupted, yellow maculations (Fig. 3). Females of N. obliterata Cresson have a similar integumental color pattern, but are readily separated from N. augustiana by the extensive black integumental color on the median portion of the propodeal triangle; shorter stout, red spine-like hairs on hind tibia (about the same length as the surrounding white hairs); and only two submarginal cells in the forewing (rarely, some specimens of N. obliterata have three). Nomada armatella Cockerell can be differentiated from N. augustiana by the black median longitudinal stripe present on the mesoscutum and propodeum; very thin white spine-like hairs on the outer apical margin of the hind tibia; and uninterrupted maculations of T2 and T3 (or, if medially-interrupted, then this interruption is extremely narrow, forming a thin longitudinal, linear gap). Nomada bethunei is also somewhat similar in the color pattern of its integument, but lacks the clear yellow integument on the scutellum (however, some individuals of N. bethunei have an ill-defined orangish area on this sclerite) (Fig. 5); also, T1 usually lacks yellow maculations (Fig. 5), although the holotype of N. bethunei from Wisconsin has broadly-interrupted, narrow yellow maculations (N. augustiana with relatively broad, medially-interrupted yellow maculations). Nomada bethunei additionally has only very short (far shorter than the surrounding white hairs), stout, red, spine-like hairs on the outer apical margin of the hind tibia (Fig. 15).


Males of N. augustiana are differentiated by the following combination of characters: mesoscutum with integument more than fifty percent red (Fig. 2); scutellum integument almost entirely yellow (Fig. 2); and hind tibia at outer apical margin with three to five white or transparent, long, stout, spine-like hairs (clearly longer than the surrounding white hairs) (Fig. 14). Males of N. obliterata have a similar color pattern on their integument but can be differentiated from N. augustiana by the color of the mesoscutum (entirely black or only with two short, red, submedian longitudinal maculations). In addition, in N. obliterata the hind tibia has reddish, stout, spine-like hairs that are only about the same length as the surrounding white hairs. Males of N. bethunei have a similar color pattern as N. augustiana, but in the former species the scutellum integument usually lacks any yellow color (a few specimens have a diffuse orange patch ) (Fig. 6), and the flagellar segments lack or only have limited patches of minute hairs present on the anterior surface (when antenna positioned dorsally). In N. augustiana, the flagellar segments are densely covered with short hairs that are clearly visible at 40–60X magnification (Fig. 23).


Distribution. Nomada augustiana is a rare southern species.

Variation. The only female known to us is the holotype specimen.

Material examined. We examined 10 specimens from GA and NC (Appendix).

Comments. We did not obtain DNA barcoding data for this species. While Mitchell only lists the holotype in his original description and we have seen no other similar specimens, the gender association seems relatively straightforward; in fact, both the holotype of N. augustiana and a specimen of N. indusata were collected on the same date, genus of tree (Salix), and locality by the same collector. Even prior to this realization it was clear from inspection that the hair pattern of the male hind tibia was simply a paler version of the long, evenly-spaced, spine-like hairs of the female, and we found other similarities between the two sexes in their body size, vase-shaped scape, relatively hairy flagellar segments of the antenna, and relative lengths of F1 and F2. Interestingly, despite the low number of specimens available for this species it seems fairly reasonable to assume that it is associated with wetland areas. Labels on the Thomasville, Georgia specimens indicate they were collected in a marsh and the Augusta, Georgia specimens were collected off of Salix, a wetland tree. A search for more specimens of this species may be rewarded by collecting near blooming Salix or around the nest sites of southern coastal plain Andrena species who favor Salix pollen (e.g., Andrena macoupinensis Robertson).


Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Salicaceae  Salix @ AMNH_BEE (1)

go to Discover Life's Facebook group

Updated: 2019-10-18 16:30:55 gmt
Discover Life | Top
© Designed by The Polistes Corporation