D I S C O V E R    L I F E   
Bee Hunt! Odonata Lepidoptera 
  HomeAll Living ThingsIDnature guidesGlobal mapperAlbumsLabelsSearch
  AboutNewsEventsResearchEducationProjectsStudy sitesHelp


Anthidium illustre Cresson, 1879
Anthidium serranum Cockerell, 1904; Callanthidium illustre (Cresson, 1879); Anthidium (Callanthidium) illustre Cresson, 1879

Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Megachilidae   Anthidium
Subgenus: Anthidium

Anthidium illustre, male, S6, apex, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 2
Anthidium illustre, male, S6, apex, VG

Click on map for details about points.

Links
80x5 - 240x3 - 240x4 - 320x1 - 320x2 - 320x3 - 640x1 - 640x2
Set display option above.
Click on images to enlarge.
Anthidium illustre, male, S8 apex, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 2
Anthidium illustre, male, S8 apex, VG
Anthidium illustre, female, midtibia1, mtg
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, female, midtibia1, mtg

Anthidium illustre, female, T6, mtg
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, female, T6, mtg
Anthidium illustre, female, midleg, mtg
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, female, midleg, mtg

Anthidium illustre, male, S6, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, male, S6, VG
Anthidium illustre, male, S7, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, male, S7, VG

Anthidium illustre, male, S8, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, male, S8, VG
Anthidium illustre, male, T7, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, male, T7, VG

Anthidium illustre, female, T6, VG
© Kimberly Huntzinger, 2007 · 1
Anthidium illustre, female, T6, VG
Identification
Extracted from: Grigarick A.A., & Stange L.A., (1968). The Pollen Collecting Bees of the Anthidiini of California (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) Bulletin of the California Insect Survey Volume 9.

The mates of iIlustre are easily separated from those of formosum by the shape of sterna VI and VIII, and tergum VII. Tergum VI of the female provides the only easily used character to distinguish iliustre from formosum as was discussed for that species.

C. iliustre is the most commonly collected species of the genus, as shown by California records of 403 males and 205 females. The distribution of the two species is similar, but C. iIlustre is found further south and apparently is more tolerant of drier conditions. C. iliustre extends throughout the varied environments of California, but its occurrence is some-what marginal in the Colorado and Mojave deserts. Plant visitations were recorded in five plant families, but over half the records were from Leguminosae (Lotus) and Hydrophyllaceae (Phacelia).

Females have been found nesting in dead flower stalks of Yucca Whipplei and stumps of oak in southern California by Hicks (1929b). The species has also been found using deserted burrows of the bee Anthophora occidentalis in clay banks in Colo- rado by Johnson (1904), and trap nests by Parker and Bohart (1966). The number of cells per burrow ranges from two to ten and the cells are in one or two columns. The cells and cocoons (fig. 216) are separated by cottony down (fig. 215). From the observations of Hicks, the females search many plants to find a suitable material, and at least three types of fibers were found in one nest. Johnson found both white and brown fibers in the same nest and speculated that the sources were pappus from composite flowers (brown) and trypetid galls (white). Hicks found one female to fly 103 feet from her nest to a source plant, Lepidospartum squamatum. The female uses her mandibles to scrape the tomentum from the plant and carries it back as a ball under her legs. The nesting burrows were closed by caps consisting of small pieces of old stems, seeds, and pebbles held together by a small amount of resin. The pollen ball was derived from Lotus scoparius in southern California. It took eighteen days from pupation to the emergence of the adult in one case. Mating was observed by Hicks around the pollen source plants. He found a cerambycid larva, Tragidion armatum, in one nest that was probably responsible for the mechanical destruction of two cells. Birds destroyed some cells by forcing their beaks into the nest.


Names
Scientific source:

Supported by

Hosts · map
FamilyScientific name @ source (records)
Asteraceae  Cirsium undulatum @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Boraginaceae  Eriodictyon crassifolium @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Eriodictyon trichocalyx @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Phacelia distans @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Phacelia heterophylla @ UCRC_ENT (3)

Phacelia ramosissima @ UCRC_ENT (17)

Phacelia @ UCRC_ENT (6)
Fabaceae  Acmispon americanus @ UCRC_ENT (6)

Acmispon glaber @ UCRC_ENT (8)

Acmispon nevadensis @ UCRC_ENT (4)

Astragalus douglasii @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Glycyrrhiza @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Lathyrus jepsonii @ UCRC_ENT (8)

Lotus argophyllus @ UCRC_ENT (2)

Lotus wrightii @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Lupinus formosus @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Ottleya grandiflora @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Trifolium variegatum @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Fumariaceae  Ehrendorferia chrysantha @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Lamiaceae  Monardella linoides @ UCRC_ENT (1)

Salvia officinalis @ UCRC_ENT (2)
Malvaceae  Gossypium @ UCRC_ENT (1)
Plantaginaceae  Penstemon @ UCRC_ENT (26)

go to Discover Life's Facebook group

Updated: 2019-10-19 22:17:30 gmt
Discover Life | Top
© Designed by The Polistes Corporation