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Sphex habenus Say, 1832
Life   Insecta   Hymenoptera   Apoidea   Sphecidae   Sphex
Subgenus: Sphex

Sphex habenus
© Tim Lethbridge, www.photos.thelethbridges.net · 9
Sphex habenus

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Sphex habenus, face
© Scott Nelson · 9
Sphex habenus, face
Sphex habenus, female, top
© Scott Nelson · 9
Sphex habenus, female, top

Sphex habenus, male
© Patrick Coin · 9
Sphex habenus, male
Sphex habenus, male, thorax
© Scott Nelson · 9
Sphex habenus, male, thorax

Sphex habenus, male
© Patrick Coin · 9
Sphex habenus, male
Sphex habenus, male, top
© Patrick Coin · 9
Sphex habenus, male, top

Sphex habenus, male, top
© Patrick Coin · 9
Sphex habenus, male, top
Sphex habenus, Male
© Copyright Sheryl Pollock 2011 · 8
Sphex habenus, Male

Sphex habenus, Male
© Copyright Sheryl Pollock 2011 · 7
Sphex habenus, Male
Sphex habenus
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Sphex habenus

Sphex habenus, face
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Sphex habenus, face
Sphex habenus, thorax
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Sphex habenus, thorax

Sphex habenus, side
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Sphex habenus, side
Sphex habenus, face
Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab; Photographer: Erika Tucker · 1
Sphex habenus, face
Overview
Taken from: Bohart, R.M., Menke, A.S. 1963. A Reclassification of the Sphecinae: With a Revision of the Nearctic Species of the Tribes Sceliphronini and Sphecini.
Male.—Average length 29 mm; head, thorax, petiole, and legs black; wings nearly clear; gaster red; erect hair of head and thorax golden; face with extensive appressed silvery pubescence; postocular area, lobe and apex of pronotum, scutum laterally, tegula, postscutellum, propodeal enclosure, and area above hind coxa with appressed golden pubescence; mesopleura from base of mid coxa to episternal suture, and metapleura along stigmatal groove with a band of appressed golden pubescence; mesosternum with appressed golden pubescence; flagellum as in figure 89, sternite VII with a broad V-shaped notch posteriorly, sides of plate elevated and bearing numerous stout setae; sternite VIII broadly rounded, slightly acuminate posteriorly, plate roundly depressed mesally; genitalia as in figures 71 and 77.
Female.—Average length 25 mm; abdomen black or rarely red; wings slightly yellowish brown; facial pubescence golden; mesopleura with a spot of silvery gold appressed pubescence behind pronotal lobe and above mid coxa; mesosternum without appressed golden pubescence; fore femur with much fine erect hair on lower one-half of outer surface,

Names
Scientific source:

Sphex habenus Say (Figs. 11,71,77) Sphex habena Say, 1832, New species of North American insects chiefly of Louisiana, p. 14. Type lost. Sphex lauta Cresson, 1872, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., 4:212. Holotype ♀, Dallas, Texas (ANSP). Sphex lauta var. illustris Cresson, 1872, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., 4:210. Holotype ♀, Texas (ANSP). Sphex princeps Kohl, 1890, Ann. K. K. Naturhist. Hofmus. Wien, 5:200. Holotype ♀, no data (VIENNA). Sphex chrysophorus Kohl, 1890, Ann. K. K. Naturhist’. Hofmus. Wien, 5:201. Holotype ♀, Mexico (BUDAPEST). Sphex lanciger Kohl, 1895, Ann. K. K. Naturhist. Hofmus. Wien, 10:55. Holotype ♂, New Orleans (BERLIN).


Geographic distribution
Distribution.—S. habenus occurs in the southeastern United States (North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas) and ranges south into Mexico (fig. 11).

Natural history
We have studied the types of lauta and illustris. Bohart has examined princeps. Kohl’s figure of the male sternites of lanciger positively identify the species as a synonym of habenus. S. chrysophorus is probably a specimen with a reddish abdomen, an infrequent color form in habenus females. Biology.—Strandtmann (1953) recorded nymphal Tettigoniidae as prey.

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Updated: 2019-12-12 14:30:18 gmt
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